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Showing Questions in 'Halacha (General Jewish Law)'

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Question No. 1368
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted 8 Jul 2007
The Question I have heard that there is a custom not to remove bread from the table before birchat Hamazon. What is the reason for such a custom? Where is this custom brought down in the poskim (where in the S"A)? Please leave me the source that brings down such a custom. —JF, New Jersey
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


Question No. 1366
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted 8 Jul 2007
The Question If parents are divorced and the biological father is supporting the children but not physically near to them although they are in touch frequently and the stepfather has a different minhag from the biological father, when the son is learning for bar mitzva is he supposed to learn the minhag of his biological father or his mother's husband? Also, in this case, who says Baruch Sheptarani at the bar mitzva? Thank you for your help in advance. —Anonymous, Israel
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


Question No. 1364
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted 6 Jul 2007
The Question Shalom Aliechem Rabbi Leff. I wanted to ask regarding moving a cellphone on Shabbat Le'Tzorch Gufo U'Mekomo (e.g., if used as an alarm clock, and moving it out of room when it's ringing). My question: Is it permitted to move it - since in my house the cellphone, when moved, displays less 'reception signals' on its screen, and may even get out of the cellular signal range? Thank you, Mordechai, Ramat Beit Shemesh
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


Question No. 1360
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted 13 Jun 2007
The Question Kovod Rabbi Leff My wife and I have been going downhill with keeping shabbath. My wife has been questioning why she should continue to go to the Mikvah. I tried explaining to her that this is something I will not except. Is keeping shabbath more important than the Mikvah? is it hippocritical to be stringent on the Mikvah and not on shabbath. can you please discuss the importance to our family when it comes to the mikvah and what importance does keeping shabbath bring to a family. Is one greater then the other in keeping it for the family. —anonymous, canada
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


Question No. 1357
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted 11 Jun 2007
The Question Can the Rabbi issue a Psak Din on the permissibility of learning in depth Chabad Chassidus(Maymorim, Sichos and Tanya) written by the Rebbe's of Chabad and other related material. Can the Rav clarify whether Chassidus is equated with Kabbalah a therefore forbiden to be learned in depth. Thank You —Danny, Melbourne, Australia
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


Question No. 1355
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted 9 Jun 2007
The Question is it permissible to wash for netilat yadayim with a cup that has a lip and can be used for a pitcher Also, must the cup have two handles??? —Anonymous, Ramat Bet Shemesh
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


Question No. 1348
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted 3 Jun 2007
The Question It seems to me that society today is based on theft. You buy a product in the hope that it lasts and the manufacturers design them in advance to break after a certain period of time. Sometimes it is a choice between a "name" brand and a store brand trying to assert it is equivalent to the store brand and maybe it is or is not. Is there any halachic justification for these practices? Aside from products, I have seen in the food area, for e.g. meat, where the butcher has tucked all the unsightly fat beneath the meat in the display container so the customer can't know what he is buying until after he has opened it. What about the case of ground meat or salami where the butcher presumably takes all the meat a consumer would never buy and so the person buys it without realizing what he is really consuming? Since this is to be expected would this then not be considered theft? Thank you very much for this great service. —Anonymous, United States
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


Question No. 1329
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted 7 Mar 2007
The Question Kavod HaRav, I often go to a friend's appartment to learn. She lives only with her sister, who on many occasions has been out and later returned to the apartment together with her boyfriend. Is it an isur of yichud to be in this situation (3 girls and 1 boy) considering that no parents or other people live there? What if the door is kept a little bit open? To leave the appartment any time this happens could be insulting and cause a chillul Hashem to 2 people already struggling with their yiddishkeit. In addition this would be terribly inconvenient and take away our learning time. Often there is no other option of a place for us to meet. Thank you! —Anonymous, Canada
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


Question No. 1327
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted 7 Mar 2007
The Question L'Chvod Harav Shlitah: I am inquiring as to a conflict regarding the subject of a yerusha. An uncle who never married and left no children and no written will was niftar. Years ago he had placed all his monies into various joint accounts with his surviving twin brother who is a widow with one married son. The surviving children of the three other deceased brothers are claiming that the uncle's monies should be equally divided into four shares; one per brother. A frum lawyer has stated that the joint accounts are legally binding, even in the absence of a will, and the surviving twin assumes legal ownership of all funds and is under no legal requirements to disburse any amounts. Can the Rabbi possibly shed Halachic insight into the ramifications of this matter in an effort to ensure achdus and sholom among the family members? Yasher Koach and thank you for your time, effort, and concern in this matter. —Anonymous, Brooklyn, New York, 11234
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


Question No. 1321
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted 27 Feb 2007
The Question Dear Rabbi, I am asking this question because I do not seem to be able to get a clear answer from the people in my community. I was recently engaged. It ended. There is a disagreement as to if he ended it (my contention) or if it was mutual (his contention). I would like to know if I am required by Torah Law to return the gifts that I received from him. (Engagement ring, jewelry, wig) I would like to sell these items and begin to recoup the losses that I incurred for the wedding and moving. I moved to NY before the wedding because that is where he is from and we were going to live. I simply want to know once and for all what does Torah permit me to do with these items. No one here wants to tell me. —Anonymous, Cleveland OH
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


Question No. 1309
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted 18 Feb 2007
The Question Is a Kohen allowed to marry a woman who is the daughter of a Jewish woman and non-Jewish man? —Anonymous, Israel
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


Question No. 1308
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted 16 Feb 2007
The Question My shul recently appointed a new Rov. Both he and his predecessor are talmidei chachomim of high repute albeit that the new Rov is less experienced in paskening for a community. The previous Rov (owing to his vast knowledge and practical approach) had a reputation for being able to be meikil in many areas. He considered his pesokim to be lechatchila and they were widely accepted. Our new Rav has made it known that whilst he has no objection to anyone relying on the pesokim of the previous Rov, going forward he will pasken as he sees fit and will not be bound by the previous Rovís pesokim. (i) Am I required to change my existing practices to conform to the new Ravís opinions as they become known? (ii) In new situations, when both opinions are know may I choose to rely on the previous Rov (lekulo) rather that the new Rov? (iii) Should these questions have been addressed to the new or old Rov? Many thanks for this wonderful service Anon —Anonymous
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


Question No. 1304
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted 14 Feb 2007
The Question Kavod Harov. Recently a man who runs a large annual 'learning' event in England where all strands of 'Judaism' are represented and give talks. (including traditional Orthodox speakers as well as reform and liberal etc) came to speak to the Jewish students at our university. Is it mutar to speak loshon horah about this person as he is involved in running an event in which people will hear Orthodox perspectives and non-Orthodox perspectives in the same forum and thus be misled to believe they have equal validity? —Adam, Leeds, UK
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


Question No. 1301
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted 8 Feb 2007
The Question If a married lady missed zman Hadlokas Neiros but managed to have a goy light the candles during Bein Hashmoshos and the room was lit up anyway, would she have to add an additional candle henceforth? Thank you very much for your help! —Anonymous, Brooklyn,NY
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


Question No. 1299
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted 8 Feb 2007
The Question I got married a month ago and b''H i got a lot of presents. Do i need to take maaser from the presents, and if yes, how do i do so? —David, London
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


Question No. 1292
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted 1 Feb 2007
The Question Dear Rabbi Leff, Shlita - Sometimes I have found myself in the situation where on Rosh Hashanah Mussaf - Chazaras Hashatz, Aleinu - that I am still davening and not able to "Bow Down" on the ground with the Tzibbur. Can I do it on my own later? Thank you! —Moshe, New Jersey
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


Question No. 1291
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted 20 Nov 2006
The Question I know someone who does not seperate his feet after the Yomim Noraim Kiddusha until the chazzan finishes the Bracha of Hamelech Hakadosh. Is this the proper procedure and does the Rav know of a mikor for this.Thank You —Anonymous, New Jersey
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


Question No. 1287
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted 18 Nov 2006
The Question Lichvod Harav Shlit"a: May a man trim his nose hairs? If not in general is there a leniency for dating purposes? —Anonymous, new york
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


Question No. 1280
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted 6 Nov 2006
The Question Can a person prepare Tzitzit at night? —Avi, Haifa
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


Question No. 1278
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted 3 Nov 2006
The Question L'kovud Harav. What is the situation regarding "mokom kovua"? Some people seem to get extremely pushy regarding this practice of davening in a fixed place and in my opion go over board. I recently passed a shtender that had a note on it only allowing old people to use it when the owner wasn't around and it concluded with a reference to Choshon Mishpot siman 120 sif 8 at the end of the ramo which deals with mokom kovua. What are the implications of that Ramo there? Thank you very much. —Anonymous, United States
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


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