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Showing Questions in 'Halacha (General Jewish Law)'

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Question No. 263
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted Mid 2003
The Question I have heard that if one is in the medical/health fields, (i.e. doctor, nurse etc...) there are no halachic issues regarding negiah, since the care they are providing is "professional." To what extent does this apply- as I know that I, as a woman nurse, as well as the other health care providers, are often met with very great and personal/private needs by patients in the hospital. I thank the Rav very much for His time and attention. Anonymous
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


Question No. 259
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted Mid 2003
The Question I was wondering how to commemorate the upcoming yahrzeit of a young holocaust victim. He was my distant relative; nobody from his immediate family has survived so he probably never had kaddish said for him. I decided to do something about it, so that it wouldnít be forgotten that such person existed. Would you think that paying somebody to say kaddish for him or learn mishnayos would be a good idea? (they offer such services at www.yahrzeit.org) Could I, as a woman, learn mishnayos on his yahrzeit myself? If not, what should I learn on this day if anything? Which prayers/psalms should I say? I would appreciate any ideas how to honor this day. Thank you very much. Anonymous, Lodz, Poland
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


Question No. 255
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted Mid 2003
The Question Someone I know had a problem last week. They have the custom of mourning on Erev Shabbat, parshat chukat, which I believe is due to the burning of 2 Sifrei Torah. They followed this custom in Israel and then flew to America where chukat was the following week. They were unsure if they needed to fast again. Thank you. David, Pennsylvania
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


Question No. 253
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted Mid 2003
The Question May I inform someone via e-mail that there is a negative discussion about him on an internet message board? Is that rechilus? Or is it public enough to be considered be-apei telasa? Even if it is be-apei telasa, is that a heter in this case? Anonymous, Brooklyn
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


Question No. 251
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted Mid 2003
The Question Shalom Aleichem, Is there any svorah to say that kol isha does NOT apply to goyish women singing? Yitzchok Schuster, Forest Hills, NY
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


Question No. 250
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted Mid 2003
The Question I am doing a science report on genetic engineering in food (that is where they insert pieces of DNA from different species into a plant or animal's DNA in order to produce an organism with traits it does not naturally have). Is this Halachically permissible, or is it considered kilayim? Tova, Chicago
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


Question No. 245
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted Mid 2003
The Question Is it ever permissible to attend a reform shul? My fiancť and I are both ba'alei teshuvah and her grandparents insist that we attend a Friday night service at their reform temple (which is out of town from where we live). Assuming that no melachos are violated and there is no active participation in the service by us is it permissible for us to stand in the sanctuary for the sake of shalom bayis? Her grandparents would be highly offended if we did not attend, and I want to not start off new family relationships on the wrong foot. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks, and take care. Paul, Chicago
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


Question No. 232
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted Mid 2003
The Question When a the Rabbi of a Shul goes up to make his speech, do we have to stand up for him? Is it a Halacha (law) or a Minhag (traadition)? Joey Cohen, Miami
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


Question No. 221
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted Mid 2003
The Question What is the specific issur for a man to pluck out hairs from his beard? Anonymous
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


Question No. 219
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted Mid 2003
The Question How is one allowed to halachically acquire a credit card from a jewishly owned company or borrow money from an Israeli bank or buy Israel bonds when all of these may involve a payment of interest. Thank you. David, Pennsylvania
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


Question No. 214
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted Mid 2003
The Question Why donít Jewish men wear jewelry? Yehuda, Monsey, NY
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


Question No. 208
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted Early 2003
The Question During conversations, I often hear other people speaking negatively about well known Jewish figures. To exempt themselves from the issur of lashon hara, they say that the person's deeds are well known, or even that the person is an official rasha, so it's a "mitzva" to speak negatively about him. But I would like to know, just because one rav or godol declared a person as a rasha, is that a heter to speak unlimited bad things about that person - especially if other rabbonim don't think of him as a rasha and if I anyway have nothing to do with that person? Moshe Peretz Mann, Eretz Yisrael
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


Question No. 205
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted Early 2003
The Question I think there are two posukim in shas that speak about not walking more then 4 amos without learning Torah (or wearing tefillin) I think the Rabbi was Rav Yochonon. Does the Rav possibly recall the location of these (or one) posukim in shas? Moshe, Tzfat
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


Question No. 204
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted Early 2003
The Question In Question 72, the Rav answered that girls should be dressed according to the Halachos of Tznius from age three, according to opinion that the Bi'ur Halachah brings down, even though we are normally lenient like the Chazon Ish. However, I was under the impression that the Chazon Ish said his Psak with regards to this very Bi'ur Halachah, as is found in Sefer Chazon Ish, Hilchos Brachos, Siman Tes-Vav. Also, Tosfos in Sotah says that while one is using his own voice, he cannot hear another person's voice according to Halachah, for example to answer Amen to a Brachah while he is davening at the same time. Does this apply even while one is reading quiet enough that he cannot even hear himself? I have also heard that an Eitzah when one finds himself in a situation involving Kol Isha is to sing along or make another noise to himself, and to make his voice louder. Could it be that according to this Tosfos, one does not have to be louder than the Kol Isha, but just audible to himself? Baruch Tzvi, Yerushalayim Leff's response
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


Question No. 202
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted Early 2003
The Question As a woman who became da'atiah as a child, I have always had uncomfortable family relations. To this day, many of my relatives do not acknowledge my existence. Matters have not been helped by my fractious mother, who alienated her siblings, neighbors, employees and other acquaintances over the years over various unkind emotional outbursts and betrayals of confidences. The only happy family relationships I have are with my son, an aunt and uncle I'm fond of, and my "sister." I have two related shailot: My mother "pulled the plug" on her dying sister many years ago, after protracted talks with me and other people about the halachot against doing so. She remains proud of what she's done and it has been a sore point in family relations ever after. I am close with an aunt & uncle who never speak to her over her failure to to be kind to them. Additionally, my child grew up a ben yachid as I was an agunah. His father deserted us on the day he was born and we suffered years of poverty and harassment from him as a result, even after I purchased the "get." Now that I live in Israel while my son completes college in the USA, my mother has repeatedly pleaded her case with him (in my absence) that I abandoned him like his father, and that he can abandon Judaism, and me, over my phoniness. He is already on the brink of leaving Judaism over the pains he suffered at seeing me maligned and mistreated by his father and rabbanim all his life. My father is niftar and he suffered from my mother's acid tongue terribly. I only continued a relationship with her (it is always a struggle) at my son's request to have some semblance of family ties. Am I allowed by halacha to sever the relationship with my mother? I have been afraid of her since she killed her sister. I have spent a lifetime listening to a litany of other people's complaints about her behavior, she shuns therapy, and there is no hope for her improvement. Now she is shattering my only loving family relationship in her effort to seem superior to someone else (her constant problem). Worse, she is doing it with my son, who begged me to continue the relationship with her in the first place when he was little! My mother and father adopted an infant girl before I was born. She had gentile parents and has never observed the tenets of Judaism other than paper plates for Passover and lighting Shabbat candles a few times. Her daughter is about to be married to the son of a reform "rabbi." Are the daughter or the mother considered Jewish (your response will determine my level of participation - or lack of it - in the "simcha") and am I allowed al pi halacha to particpate in the marriage celebration at all? Various rabbanim have differed over the issue of my "sister's" Jewishness over the years, with no clearcut resolution. If I choose not to celebrate the forthcoming "marriage" I risk invoking further family wrath over my Orthodoxy. I am fond of my "sister" and Jewish husband, but I am not willing to participate in a sham of Jewishness. I wonder if the groom is Jewish, considering his "yichus" and the whole issue perplexes me with related issues and questions. Perhaps neither one is a Jew and the whole ceremony with allegedly Jewish content will be a waste. What is the Rav's response to my shailot? Leff's response
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


Question No. 200
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted Early 2003
The Question Is one obligated to keep his tzizis out or is he allowed to keep them in because that's the accepted minhag in his family? Anonymous, Australia
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


Question No. 198
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted Early 2003
The Question Is a Jewish man allowed to color his hair to take out the grey?
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


Question No. 197
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted Early 2003
The Question I have a couple of questions regarding a person's *second* marriage: a)I've heard that it is not proper to have a large wedding for a second marriage. Is this true? b) That the bride cannot wear a white gown, but should wear a suit or something similar? c) That the couple's children from their first marriages are not allowed to attend their wedding? Thank you. Anonymous,
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


Question No. 194
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted Early 2003
The Question Dear Rabbi Leff. If Iím sitting in shul, or in a beis midrash learning, and I need to blow my nose, and there are no tissues or toilet paper in the lavatory, and I see a package of tissues lying around, would it be considered stealing to take a tissue, or do we assume that people donít mind? Anonymous, Israel
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


Question No. 191
Category Halacha (General Jewish Law)
Date Posted Early 2003
The Question This is a follow-up to question 171. Why is it that we prefer employing Jews over non-Jews (in the case that they do equal work for equal wages)? How can this be justified, for example, to a non-Jew accusing Jews of favoritism? Anonymous, Canada
The Answer Click here to listen to Rabbi Leff's answer.


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